Skin Cancer Myrtle Beach SC

Cancer is an extremely scary and life changing disease. If you or someone you know has been diagnosed with skin cancer, read the following articles to better understand the disease and to learn helpful information such as screening techniques and different treatment options that are available.
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Chemoimmunotherapy for Metastatic Melanoma Myrtle Beach SC

Melanoma is an aggressive form of skin cancer. Metastatic melanoma refers to cancer that has spread from its site of origin to distant, often invading vital organs such as the brain or liver. Patients with metastatic melanoma are often considered incurable and receive treatment to improve quality of life and/or duration of survival. Melanoma tends to respond poorly to most traditional treatments.

Risk of Melanoma in Women Myrtle Beach SC

Melanoma is a cancer of the skin that usually begins in the form of a mole. The cancer can grow deep into the skin and spread to different parts of the body through blood or lymph vessels. It usually spreads first to lymph nodes that are near the site of cancer origin and when advanced, can spread to organs and other lymph nodes throughout the body.

Tips for Melanoma Prevention Myrtle Beach SC

Skin cancers, which include basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and melanoma, occur more commonly than any other type of cancer. In general, basal cell carcinomas and the most common squamous cell carcinomas are related to chronic sun exposure and are cured by surgical removal. Melanoma is a potentially fatal type of skin cancer that begins in the melanocytes, which are the cells that are responsible for skin color.

Stage I Melanoma Myrtle Beach SC

Patients with stage I malignant melanoma have cancer that is found in the outer layer of the skin (epidermis) and/or the upper part of the inner layer of skin (dermis), but has not spread to lymph nodes. The primary melanoma is less than 2 millimeters (1/16 of an inch) thick.

Stage II Melanoma Myrtle Beach SC

Patients with stage II melanoma have cancer that is 1 to 2 millimeters with ulceration or greater than 2 mm with or without ulceration. Stage II melanoma has spread to the lower part of the inner layer of skin (dermis), but not into the tissue below the dermis or into nearby lymph nodes. Ulceration refers to the microscopic presence of continuous epidermis in the tissue overlying the melanoma and is an important prognostic factor for stage II melanoma.

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Chemoimmunotherapy for Metastatic Melanoma Myrtle Beach SC

Melanoma is an aggressive form of skin cancer. Metastatic melanoma refers to cancer that has spread from its site of origin to distant, often invading vital organs such as the brain or liver. Patients with metastatic melanoma are often considered incurable and receive treatment to improve quality of life and/or duration of survival. Melanoma tends to respond poorly to most traditional treatments.

Don’t Rely Solely on Sunscreen to Protect Your Skin Myrtle Beach SC

The best ways to protect your skin from the sun are to wear sun-protective clothing and hats and to minimize your time in the sun. Sunscreen can play a role in sun protection, but it must be used correctly and should not be used to extend your time in the sun. An alarming trend in both melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancers is that the frequency of these cancers is increasing-including the frequency in children and young adults.

Expanded Access Program Initiated for Genasense®/Dacarbazine for Patients with Advanced Melanoma Myrtle Beach SC

Expanded Access Program Initiated for Genasense®/Dacarbazine for Patients with Advanced Melanoma Patients with advanced melanoma may be eligible for treatment with Genasense® plus dacarbazine at certain clinical sites in the U.S. through an Expanded Access Program (EAP). Melanoma is a type of aggressive skin cancer that begins in the form of a mole. Over the past 30

How to Do a Skin Self-Exam Myrtle Beach SC

checking your skin regularly, you will learn what is normal for you. It may be helpful to record the dates of your skin exams and to write notes about the way your skin looks. If your doctor has taken photos of your skin, you can compare your skin to the photos to help check for changes. If you find anything unusual, see your doctor.

How to Recognize Early Signs of Skin Cancer Myrtle Beach SC

Any changes to your skin should be discussed promptly with your healthcare provider. In particular, the following lists of abnormalities may be signs of nonmelanoma skin cancer or melanoma. Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer: A sore that does not heal. Areas of the skin that are: Small, raised, smooth, shiny, and waxy. Read on to find out more.

Nonsurgical Approaches to Treatment of Skin Cancer Myrtle Beach SC

For a majority of patients, effective initial treatment involves one of several different types of surgery. In certain cases, however, other options may be considered. Nonsurgical approaches to the treatment of basal cell and squamous cell skin cancers include radiation therapy, topical medications (medications applied to the skin), and still experimental approaches such as photodynamic therapy.

Overview of Non-Melanoma Skin Cancer Myrtle Beach SC

Basal cell carcinoma accounts for roughly 80% of all cases of non-melanoma skin cancer. It most commonly develops on sun-exposed skin, with the head (particularly the nose) and neck being the most common sites. The appearance of basal cell carcinoma varies. It often appears as a raised bump with a smooth, pearly or waxy appearance. It may also look like a firm, flat scar.

Recurrent Melanoma Myrtle Beach SC

Patients with recurrent or refractory metastatic melanoma may be divided into 2 groups: patients who have failed initial systemic therapy (chemotherapy and/or biologic therapy) and experience progression or recurrence after an initial response to treatment or patients who have local recurrences(skin and/or regional lymph nodes) after initial surgery or surgery and adjuvant therapy.

Risk of Melanoma in Women Myrtle Beach SC

Melanoma is a cancer of the skin that usually begins in the form of a mole. The cancer can grow deep into the skin and spread to different parts of the body through blood or lymph vessels. It usually spreads first to lymph nodes that are near the site of cancer origin and when advanced, can spread to organs and other lymph nodes throughout the body.

Skin Cancer Overview Myrtle Beach SC

Skin cancer generally develops in the epidermis. The three main types of cells in the epidermis are squamous cells, basal cells, and melanocytes. Squamous cells form a flat layer of cells at the top of the epidermis. Basal cells are round cells found beneath the squamous cells. Melanocytes are pigment-producing cells that are generally found in the lower part of the epidermis.

Skin Cancer Prevention Tips from the Skin Cancer Foundation Myrtle Beach SC

The development of skin cancer is certainly a risk for any individual, but particularly for those of us who spend time in the outdoors. It’s important to keep in mind, however, that by taking certain steps to protect yourself from the sun, you can safely enjoy your time outside. The following recommendations from Skin Cancer Foundation tell you how. Read on to find out more.

Skin Cancer Screening and Prevention Myrtle Beach SC

Individuals with a family history of skin cancer are also more likely to develop skin cancer. In rare cases, this is due to a known familial cancer syndrome such as xeroderma pigmentosum, oculocutaneous albinism, or basal cell nevus syndrome. Individuals with xeroderma pigmentosum are extremely sensitive to ultraviolet radiation and have a very high probability of developing skin cancer.

Skin Cancer: What You Need to Know Now Myrtle Beach SC

Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the United States, with more than 1 million new cases each year. Skin cancer is often divided into two broad categories: melanoma and nonmelanoma. Nonmelanoma skin cancer refers to several different types, but the most common are basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. An alarming trend in both melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancers is that the frequency of these cancers is increasing—including the frequency in children and young adults.

Stage I Melanoma Myrtle Beach SC

Patients with stage I malignant melanoma have cancer that is found in the outer layer of the skin (epidermis) and/or the upper part of the inner layer of skin (dermis), but has not spread to lymph nodes. The primary melanoma is less than 2 millimeters (1/16 of an inch) thick.

Stage II Melanoma Myrtle Beach SC

Patients with stage II melanoma have cancer that is 1 to 2 millimeters with ulceration or greater than 2 mm with or without ulceration. Stage II melanoma has spread to the lower part of the inner layer of skin (dermis), but not into the tissue below the dermis or into nearby lymph nodes. Ulceration refers to the microscopic presence of continuous epidermis in the tissue overlying the melanoma and is an important prognostic factor for stage II melanoma.

Stage III Melanoma Myrtle Beach SC

Stage III melanoma includes cancers of any thickness with tumor spread to regional lymph nodes. The extent or amount of tumor in the lymph nodes is the most important prognostic factor for patients with stage III melanoma. The presence of micrometastases, defined as tumor detected by sentinel lymph node biopsy, is more favorable than the presence of macrometastases, which are defined as clinically detectable nodal metastases. Similarly, one lymph node that contains tumor is more favorable than having four or more involved lymph nodes.

Stage IV Melanoma Myrtle Beach SC

Patients with stage IV, or metastatic, melanoma have cancer that has spread from its site of origin to distant lymph nodes and/or distant sites. Additional prognostic factors for stage IV melanoma include site of distant metastases and elevated blood enzyme LDH levels. Distant lymph node metastases and lung metastases have a better prognosis than other distant metastases, such as the brain or liver.

Surgery for Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer Myrtle Beach SC

To reduce the likelihood of cancer recurrence—and the more extensive treatment that may be required to manage a recurrence—effective initial treatment is important. For a majority of patients, this involves treatment with one of several different types of surgery. Surgery is the most extensively studied approach to treating nonmelanoma skin cancer and generally provides excellent cure rates.

Tips for Melanoma Prevention Myrtle Beach SC

Skin cancers, which include basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and melanoma, occur more commonly than any other type of cancer. In general, basal cell carcinomas and the most common squamous cell carcinomas are related to chronic sun exposure and are cured by surgical removal. Melanoma is a potentially fatal type of skin cancer that begins in the melanocytes, which are the cells that are responsible for skin color.

Tips for Prevention of Skin Cancer Myrtle Beach SC

Dermatologists commonly recommend a broad spectrum sunscreen that protects against UVB and UVA, with a recommended minimum SPF ranging from 15 to 30. Ingredients such as titanium dioxide, zinc oxide, and avobenzone (Parsol 1789) indicate broad spectrum protection. In addition, a sunscreen approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 2006—Anthelios SX —may offer improved protection against UVA along with protection against UVB.

Treatment for Non-Melanoma Skin Cancer Myrtle Beach SC

The following is a general overview of treatment for non-melanoma skin cancer. Treatment may consist of surgery, radiation therapy, or topical therapy. In some cases, participation in a clinical trial utilizing new, innovative therapies may provide the most promising treatment. Treatments that may be available through clinical trials are discussed in the section titled Strategies to Improve Treatment.

What is Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer? Myrtle Beach SC

Basal cell carcinoma accounts for roughly 80 percent of all cases of nonmelanoma skin cancer. Basal cell carcinoma most commonly develops on sun-exposed skin, with the head (particularly the nose) and neck being the most common sites. This type of skin cancer very rarely metastasizes (spreads beyond the skin), but it can cause extensive local damage to the skin and surrounding tissues.